What’s in your healthy breakfast?

What’s in your healthy breakfast?

Physical Therapy And Fibromyalgia

Do you have long-term, body-wide pain and tenderness in the joints, muscles, and tendons? Have you dealt with fatigue, sleep problems, headaches, depression, and anxiety? These are all common symptoms of Fibromyalgia

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While there is no known cure for Fibromyalgia, multiple studies have shown that physical therapy can significantly improve symptoms associated with the condition. 

At Dynamic Physical Therapy, our Therapists have advanced knowledge in Functional Manual Therapy — “an integrated treatment system that promotes optimum performance by enhancing total body mobility.” Because Fibromyalgia affects muscle flexibility and tension, our Therapists will use core FMT values to develop a specific stretching and strengthening program for each patient to meet their individual needs.

In addition to exercise, our physical therapists inform patients of a wide range of resources to take advantage of. With these tools, we can help people with fibromyalgia use their muscles, stretch for flexibility, and move their joints through range-of-motion exercises.

We allow you to work 45 minutes one-on-one with a trained professional who can design a fibromyalgia-specific treatment program. Our therapists will document your progress and gauge whether you’re practicing good habits, alignments, and movement patterns.

Don’t live with the pain of Fibromyalgia! Visit our site for more information!

THERAPIST SPOTLIGHT: Jonathan Knipping, PT, DPT

 
  • What inspired you to become a PT?        
  • After college, I found work in the interactive entertainment media industry. It was a creative office environment, but I was barely scraping by financially year after year, and while studying yoga and martial arts in my spare time, I slowly became dissatisfied with the contributions of my work to society and the greater good. I wanted my job to be about helping people in real, tangible ways, not just distracting them from their problems of enabling them to waste more of their lives staring at a screen. One day I was showing my grandmother some Yoga exercises and she asked me if I had ever considered physical therapy as a career.
  • What do you love the most about working at DPT
  • There is so much to love about working at DPT: we always spend extended time working one-on-one with our patients; the administrative staff, exercise techs and other therapists there are all a pleasure to work with; all the therapists work with the same treatment framework of Functional Manual Therapy™, which makes collaboration and communication very easy; but I think the best thing about working at Dynamic is the training in Functional Manual Therapy™ that I get on an almost constant basis. The coursework in FMT™ given by the Institute of Physical Art is excellent, and working in an environment where everyone does FMT™ enables the material learned at the courses to be processed and become effective clinical practice very quickly, which makes for faster, better patient outcomes, and greater job satisfaction.
  • Tell us a bit about your hobbies outside of work.    
  • Outside work I enjoy food and travel (last big trip was honeymoon to Japan 3 years ago), family time (wife and 3-year-old daughter), playing guitar, and practicing Yoga and martial arts. I have a third degree black belt in Aikido (“the way of harmonizing energy”), a style created to neutralize aggression through non-violent self-defense, and I am also a student of Tai Chi, jujitsu, and hold teaching certifications in two styles of Yoga. I am also a sci-fi and fantasy enthusiast and and AFOL (Adult Fan of LEGO).
  • What’s the one thing that distinguishes you at DPT?  
  • The thing that distinguishes me at work is probably my laid-back, mellow demeanor and calm, soothing presence, so I have been told…
  • What has been one of your greatest challenges that you’ve faced as a PT? How did you overcome it?      
  • The greatest challenge I face as a PT, which is an ongoing thing, is to integrate the best of what Western science (a.k.a. “evidence based practice”) and Eastern traditional health practices have to offer. Complementary and alternative health practices are becoming more and more prevalent in our society, and it is becoming clear that we need to do something to emphasize early intervention and prevention of chronic disease in this society to reduce our reliance on expensive surgical and pharmaceutical interventions in the later stages of disease in order to control healthcare costs and prevent needless pain and suffering. This is where the ancient wisdom of the East and the concepts of mindfulness and self-awareness can help. The Western biomedical model is one useful lens through which we can examine the concepts of health and wellness, but it does not encompass the full spectrum of the human experience and the myriad factors at play in our lives. Having other models or frameworks to lend new perspectives to problems patients are struggling with can only be beneficial. The idea in “in addition to, not instead of.
  • What unique skills do you possess that affect your style of work?                                                                                                  
  • I think my background in mindful exercise (martial arts and Yoga) makes my physical therapy treatment style unique. Breath awareness, control, and coordination with movement is big in martial arts and Yoga and I always emphasize this with my patients. Most PTs come from strong athletic backgrounds, but I was not a very good athlete growing up. I discovered my physical side as an adult through martial arts and Yoga, and I think this experience helps me related to patients who are not and may never have been athletes themselves.
  • What do you love the most about your job?                              
  • When you study martial arts and Yoga deeply, you cannot help but delve into the realm of ethics and eventually to come face to face with the BIG questions: What is the point of this life? What should I do with the time I have been given here on earth? What is happiness and how can it be attained? My personal belief is that paradoxically, life is better when we endeavor to be selfless rather than selfish. That is why I chose a career in which I could experience the joy and satisfaction of helping people in a very tangible and relatively immediate way, by easing their physical pain and suffering and helping them to achieve their own personal goals in life. That and I get to be up and about instead of stuck behind a desk all day (no offense to any office workers out there!)
Yum! Spring is coming!

Yum! Spring is coming!

                 THERAPIST SPOTLIGHT: Chris Lindsey, PT, DPT
How do you spend your free time?
My free time at home I spend relaxing, usually watching movies or television with my friends, but also try to maintain a regular running routine as I have a half marathon coming up, and am looking to attempt a full marathon later this year.
What is one of the greatest challenges you faced as a PT, and how did you overcome it?
We are challenged on a daily basis with choosing the right technique and plan to make our care the best it can be for our patients.  I think for me the greatest challenge so far has been learning all of the nuances involved with patient interaction that they cannot teach you in school, including being supportive and interactive with the patient while remaining objective.  I have overcome this by trying to be more positive, stepping out of my comfort zone and just trying to engage the patient more, because that goes a long way when treating them.
What do you love most about your job?
I love being able to ask questions and being able to help other colleagues and patients answer questions of their own. More than that I love how we are encouraged to maintain this level of constant education.
Are there any skills you possess that you believe affect your style of work, or make you different?
One of the things I think that makes me unique is that I enjoy talking things through with my patient which definitely affects my style of care.  It forces me to engage the patient and discuss with them what I am doing, including the use of images and models, so that they understand or at least feel comfortable that I understand what I am doing, which helps to build trust between us.
Tell us what lead you to this career path.
Like many PT’s, I was an athlete from a very young age.  And again, like many PT’s I was injured and had to go to rehab myself.  I had a shoulder injury, and before undergoing any surgery, I had a poor PT who was not engaging and generally provided poor care, despite being  a nice guy.  I ended up having surgery, and chose to go to a different PT, who was completely supportive and provided phenomenal care.  Seeing the difference between the two made me not want to “Be a Physical Therapist,” as much as it made me want to be “Be a good Physical Therapist.”  
Do you have a goal you’d like to accomplish in the next year (work or life)?
In life, I mentioned earlier I would like to complete a marathon this year, but more importantly my goal is to remain healthy and injury free before, during, and after it.  

                 THERAPIST SPOTLIGHT: Chris Lindsey, PT, DPT

  • How do you spend your free time?
  • My free time at home I spend relaxing, usually watching movies or television with my friends, but also try to maintain a regular running routine as I have a half marathon coming up, and am looking to attempt a full marathon later this year.

What is one of the greatest challenges you faced as a PT, and how did you overcome it?

  • We are challenged on a daily basis with choosing the right technique and plan to make our care the best it can be for our patients.  I think for me the greatest challenge so far has been learning all of the nuances involved with patient interaction that they cannot teach you in school, including being supportive and interactive with the patient while remaining objective.  I have overcome this by trying to be more positive, stepping out of my comfort zone and just trying to engage the patient more, because that goes a long way when treating them.

What do you love most about your job?

  • I love being able to ask questions and being able to help other colleagues and patients answer questions of their own. More than that I love how we are encouraged to maintain this level of constant education.

Are there any skills you possess that you believe affect your style of work, or make you different?

  • One of the things I think that makes me unique is that I enjoy talking things through with my patient which definitely affects my style of care.  It forces me to engage the patient and discuss with them what I am doing, including the use of images and models, so that they understand or at least feel comfortable that I understand what I am doing, which helps to build trust between us.

Tell us what lead you to this career path.

  • Like many PT’s, I was an athlete from a very young age.  And again, like many PT’s I was injured and had to go to rehab myself.  I had a shoulder injury, and before undergoing any surgery, I had a poor PT who was not engaging and generally provided poor care, despite being  a nice guy.  I ended up having surgery, and chose to go to a different PT, who was completely supportive and provided phenomenal care.  Seeing the difference between the two made me not want to “Be a Physical Therapist,” as much as it made me want to be “Be a good Physical Therapist.”  

Do you have a goal you’d like to accomplish in the next year (work or life)?

  • In life, I mentioned earlier I would like to complete a marathon this year, but more importantly my goal is to remain healthy and injury free before, during, and after it.  
This is how we’ll be getting fit today! 
What about you?

This is how we’ll be getting fit today! 

What about you?

Love all of these amazing benefits! 
What’s your favorite type of interval workout?

Love all of these amazing benefits! 

What’s your favorite type of interval workout?

Are Your Magnesium Levels Healthy?

Problem:

Do you find yourself fidgety or anxious after turning in for the night? After falling asleep, you may be woken by cramps and restless legs. What’s the deal?

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Solution:

Low Magnesium levels are probably to blame. Along with a ton of other benefits, magnesium plays its most important role as a natural muscle relaxer. Insomnia, muscle spasms, twitches, restlessness, and hyperactivity are all signs of magnesium deficiency, especially during sleep.

 What Americans don’t know is that most of us (68%) are Magnesium deficient. Changes in water filtering, diet, and increased sugar consumption all correlate to lower levels of Magnesium. However, the largest problem lies with an increase in heart attacks, high blood pressure, and various other types of heart disease due to Magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium & Depression:

Magnesium levels also affect our mental health greatly. It is obvious while watching any newscast that depression among Americans is on the rise. Interestingly enough, multiple studies have found that those with chronic depression and suicidal thoughts ALSO have low Magnesium levels.

Children with hyperactivity, another common sign of magnesium deficiency, are routinely given more invasive medications as a first response, when increases in their daily Magnesium intake may solve the problem.

How To Increase Magnesium Levels:

Because it is both natural and safe, increasing your magnesium intake should be an easy and effective option before resorting to more drastic measures like prescription medications for heart and mental health. Eating a wide variety of legumes, nuts, whole grains, and veggies will help you meet your dietary need for Magnesium (usually somewhere between 300 and 400 mg per day). Some of our favorite Magnesium rich snacks are peanut butter, spinach, or avocado. You could also try a Magnesium supplement after speaking with a physician.

Remember to keep intake of nutrients and minerals important to your health at a safe level! Visit our site for more information about living pain free!

http://www.dynamicphystherapy.com/

You may find yourself doing this a lot in PT! 

You may find yourself doing this a lot in PT! 

Josephine & Jonathan

The following is Josephine Ymana and Jonathan Knipping’s account of treating a young patient who saw great success following her time with Dynamic Physical Therapy:


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We treated a 15-year-old female patient this afternoon (mother was also present). The patient complained of outside hip (trochanteric) pain in both hips after sitting in class for just one hour and while driving for less than 30 minutes. 

As expected, we found dysfunctions in the coccyx, sacrum, innominates, hip bones, and — to a large degree — in the lumbar spine and surrounding tissues. Her lumbar forward bending was only 30% without compensating with her pelvis. When allowed to compensate, she was able to touch the floor, but with significant hip pain. 

After our full evaluation, mother and daughter received a simple summary of the patient’s dysfunctions that we demonstrated on our skeleton. We illustrated that the source of the patient’s recurrent pain was not only an area of the hips — as was formerly addressed by patient’s previous attempts to relieve symptoms — but the entire relationship between the joints, neural, and soft-tissues in the lumbopelvic hip complex. This occurs when her hips are placed in tension during sitting or bending forward. 

To correct the issues, we prioritized the worst dysfunctions during treatment of the coccyx, sacrum, innominates, hip bones, both psoas (pelvic muscles), and the lumbar spine.

After preforming the post test, we noticed increase in lumbar spine flexion to 60% (doubled her motion!), and the patient also reported a decrease in her hip pain during full forward bending.